Matt Crichton:

Hello everybody and welcome to today’s Webinar, which is, as you can see on the screen, on managing internal disputes. My name is Matt Crichton, I’m from the education team here at the ACNC. And joining me to present today’s Webinar is a manager in our advice services area, Heath Eldridge. Hello, Heath.


Heath Eldridge:

Hi Matt.

Matt:
Before we do get into the topic proper, just a few administration type things to cover. First, if you’re having any trouble with the audio, which occasionally some people do, then it might be a good idea to dial in to the audio of the Webinar. And you can do that by using the phone number and the access code that you should have received in the confirmation email you got upon registering. So dig that one up, you should be able to dial in and put in an access code and listen to the Webinar if you’re having trouble with your audio. But let’s hope no one has that trouble.

Also, as we go through the presentation, feel free to ask questions using the go-to Webinar control panel on the screen. You should be able to, you should have a box available to you to shoot some questions to us. And we have our colleague Chris on standby waiting to answer your questions. And of course if Chris, if there are a few that come through that we think will be worth answering as we go along we’ll pause and answer them and have a discussion about them then.
Just on the questions, so also we will set aside a few minutes at the end following the formal presentation to do a bit of a Q and A session. So if you’d prefer to sit through the formal presentation then shoot through a question at the end, and if it’s appropriate for us to share with everyone, we might include it in the Q and A session, section at the end. If we don’t get to your question today, we will endeavour to contact you via email later on.

And also we will send an email… well first, we are recording this session as we do with all of our Webinars and we will publish it on the ACNC website in the next day or so. And we will send you a follow up email once it’s been published to let you know that it’s available online as well as the presentation slides, too. So if you do have to leave early or if you’re, I don’t know, your Wi-Fi stops working and you can’t view the rest of it, never fear, it will be published in full on the ACNC website soon. And you can share that resource with other people in your organisation.

OK. That stuff out the way, let’s have a look at today’s contents. What we will cover today is, there’s a definition of an internal dispute, we’ll have a look at what an internal dispute is. We’ll have a look of the effects on a charity of an internal dispute. The ACNCs role in internal disputes. Probably an important section, that one. And a bit of a peculiar one given the way the ACNC sits, the ACNCs jurisdiction sits with internal disputes. We’ve got some examples of some internal disputes and then a bit of a practical way to finish, some tips for managing internal disputes at the end. Some things you can do to help you along.

OK. Probably enough from my voice for a little bit. So if you have a look at the screen, we’ve got a definition of an internal dispute here. But Heath, do you want to give us an overview of what we mean by an internal dispute?

Heath:

So when we talk about an internal dispute at the ACNC, what we’re talking about is a disagreement between individuals or groups within a charity. That can be fairly broad. Disagreements may be between members of the charity, between people on the governing body, that is the board or the committee, between the staff and the members. Disagreements can raise, can range from things that are relatively minor up to significant issues and sometimes they’re easily resolved, other times it can take years to resolve.

Matt:

Yeah, right. And yeah, they can be really intractable. But it’s important to point out the internal aspect of this and that these disputes are the ones that take place within a charity. Not the general public and general supporters or donors of the charity. It’s the people that are involved in the charity either at that, you know, management, director, board level, to the staff, to the volunteers. But that internal aspect is really important.
We do hear from many people involved in charities about internal disputes that they come across. And we’ve put together just some common features of some internal disputes that we see here at the ACNC to give you a bit of an idea, illustrate the point we’re trying to make here. So Heath, what are some of the common things that we see or we hear from people about their experiences or disputes in charities?

Heath:

Well, there’s a lot of different things, but some of the examples that we’ve got here are where the directors disagree about the direction of the charity, where the members of the charity don’t like a decision the board made about a service or activity, members disagreeing with the appointment of a CEO, and probably the biggest one, the board is split in two groups and both claim to be the real board. We definitely see examples of that sort of thing.

Matt:

Yeah, right. And so these are the common things that pop up and the things that are reported to the ACNC. And I’m sure if you’re involved in a charity and you’re listening now, these might look familiar to you. The effects of internal disputes can be as wide ranging as the internal disputes themselves. And often the biggest disputes or the most intractable ones that are doing some of the most damage to an organisation can begin as small ones. But there are a few common negative effects that disputes can have on charities, Heath, and what are some of the ones that we’ve seen at the ACNC?

Heath:

Yeah, thanks Matt. We’ve seen a few different examples of those consequences for charities from internal disputes.

A big one is that resources get wasted. That could be the director’s valuable time, which is diverted from leading and governing the charity.

The charity may struggle to make decisions at the board level and can’t operate effectively. And this means it can’t pursue its charitable purposes either.

The charity risks not being able to meet reporting obligations to the ACNC and other regulators which may jeopardise its registration.

It can affect morale internally which can lead to a loss of staff and volunteers.

It can affect the reputation of the charity.

This can lead to reduced donations and then make it harder to attract volunteers and staff, or it can even affect other opportunities such as sponsorship. Poor morale, poor decision-making, and reduced funding can all lead to a lower quality of service.

Matt:

Yeah, there’s some… especially those last two are really important points that people should be careful to not overlook or even underestimate. Because I suppose if you’ve had experience you know it all too well how damage to a charity’s reputation or even potential funding can really have long lasting effects on the charity’s survival and its chances for long-term sustainability.

Heath:

Yeah, absolutely.

Matt:

So, yeah, and that last point about providing quality services, if a charity is sort of hamstrung by an internal dispute and can’t move through it, can’t continue to operate effectively, it can have downstream effects on the services it provides on the ground. Which affects the reputation and the knock-on effect of that is the lack of support, lack of funding, affects the morale and it really is a bit of a snowball effect.

Heath:

Yeah, so it’s definitely not ideal.

Matt:

The ACNC has a particular role, well, let’s cover the ACNCs role in internal disputes. We’ll go through some of the details now. Internal disputes in and of themselves are not something that the ACNC generally gets involved in, unless there is a serious risk to public trust and confidence and it may be something that the ACNC can have a look at. But this is because the ACNCs jurisdiction is sort of limited. And it’s limited as set out in its legislation. So an internal dispute that doesn’t result in breaches of the legislation or the areas in which the ACNC can or is responsible for regulating, then it’s likely to be outside the scope of the work of the ACNC and commonly internal disputes, you know, the classic internal disputes do fall outside this, outside the ACNCs scope. And… but nevertheless, we do hear a lot about internal disputes here at the ACNC.

Heath:

Yeah. Many of the internal disputes that are brought to our attention are really matters for the people involved in the charity to resolve. A lot of the time they’re disagreements about particular actions or decisions or the direction of the charity and they don’t actually broach any ACNC obligations. An example of this is where a board makes a decision that some members or staff don’t like. People may feel strongly about it, too. But an unpopular decision does not mean that the charity is failing its regulatory obligations. A lot of the time it’s hard for the people to accept this, but these disputes are the responsibility of the charity to resolve, not the ACNC.

Matt:

Yeah, and that point you make, Heath, about a board decision being unpopular but not necessarily being a breach on any obligations on the part of a charity is a really important one. It’s something that’s often overlooked when people… but particularly when they’re deeply involved in the charity and passionate about the cause, if there is a decision taken by the board that they find they don’t agree with or a few people don’t agree with it, can be, as you say, yeah, difficult to accept that this is not the role of the charity regulator to get involved in. But the fact of the matter is, it is an internal dispute, it is a disagreement and it’s not something that the ACNC gets involved in.

Heath:

I think an important point to be made there is if, let’s say the charity’s making a decision between two activities or two groups that it’s running, something to that effect. It’s not the ACNCs place to become involved and judge which one’s better or which one’s more valid. Assuming that they’re not breaching the regulations, which they normally aren’t, often won’t be, we can’t get involved there.

Matt:

That’s right. And it comes down to that I suppose when you strip around some of the periphery and some of the details, it comes down at its core to a disagreement between people involved in the charity and it’s not really the ACNCs role to mediate or to step into that disagreement. But having said that, it doesn’t mean that the ACNC will never get involved. The ACNC may get involved if the internal dispute develops into something more, something that may result in the charity not meeting its regulatory obligations. Or if the internal dispute has features that may be a breach of regulatory obligations. What are some of these, I know it may sound a little bit abstract, nebulous, but what are some of the things we’re talking about here, Heath?

Heath:

So we’ve got some examples of things that the ACNC can look into. The important point is that it’s not the actual internal dispute in and of itself the ACNC would be looking at, but problems that can arise from the internal dispute or that may be the root cause of an internal dispute. Some examples could be significant, financial mismanagement may be something’s that’s caused an internal dispute. And this would be something that the ACNC may be able to look into. If the charity’s causing harm to its beneficiaries. This may be something that the ACNC can look into. Again, in isolation, this is not really an internal dispute. It may be the result of a prolonged internal dispute or it could be the reason there’s a dispute in the first place. And also quite broadly, if there’s a breach of the ACNC governance standards of course we can look into that.

Matt:

Yeah, you’ll see a link there, a URL at the bottom of the slide there, acnc.gov.au/GovernanceStandards. They are a set of core minimum standards by which the ACNC requires all charities to operate. And it covers a range of aspects of charity governance. And it you wanted to have a look at them in detail we recommend going to that page on the ACNCs website, and we will include this link in the follow up email, too. So if you wait for that link later you will get access to it via the link in the email. Just on this, while it may be, it may have come across as a little unsatisfying to not have a clear-cut list of the things the ACNC will certainly and will certainly not look into. I’m sure you can understand that this is the nature of many of these issues, particularly with internal disputes. There are often a lot of features of an internal dispute to consider and to, you know, tear apart and have a look at. And it really does depend on the facts of each case.

But as Heath mentioned, looking at… an internal dispute in and of itself is probably not the role of the ACNC, but it’s often an indicator of other problems within the charity that may fall into the ACNCs jurisdiction. Just to cover some of this I suppose more practically, we’ve got a couple of case studies here. Just to point out of course that these aren’t real, these aren’t taken from real cases. They’re common features that we’ve seen reported to the ACNC that we’ve put together in a case study to demonstrate the sort of things that we’re talking about. So whilst it is a fictional case study, some of its features are based in reality, based on some of the things we’ve seen and heard. So Heath, do you want to take us over this case study to illustrate a point where the ACNC may not get involved?

Heath:

So in case study number one, we had a charity that was faced with a difficult decision with a couple of its programmes. They were very popular in the community but were increasingly expensive to run and relied heavily on skilled volunteers. Because their funding had shrunk a little over the past few years, it became clear to the board that cutting one of these programmes was probably necessary if the charity was to survive. The board looked over all the options over a couple of meetings and then had a vote on the direction the charity would take.

Matt:

It seems like one of those common things that may face a lot of charity boards there, continuing services but a lack of funding. One of those problems.

Heath:

Yeah, funding for programmes and services is always an important consideration, and I’d say this example is not at all unusual. In this case, the board decided that it would have to cut one of the programmes and partner with another organisation to continue to deliver the other.

Matt:

Yeah, right. Seems a reasonable decision given the facts.

Heath:

Well, it wasn’t popular among members of the charity, and certainly not amongst some supporters. The members wanted to challenge the decision and the authority of the board. We received several requests to intervene, from demands that the ACNC step in and make the board reverse its decision to the ACNC mediating a dispute resolution between the board and several members.

Matt:

Yeah, right, but in this case there doesn’t seem to be anything wrong with the processes behind the decision or the responsible persons, knowing the case and that the responsible persons acted in any way that breached the charity’s obligations or their obligations to the ACNC.

Heath:

That’s right. It was a decision that wasn’t a popular one for some people involved in the charity. But this is a dispute the ACNC can’t get involved in. The charity followed its processes and rules to make a decision about its services. The decision was made fairly, transparently, and consistently with the charity’s regular operations.

Matt:

So in this case the ACNC doesn’t take on the role of mediator or peace maker or deal breaker or anything like that?

Heath:

No. We’d probably recommend that the people involved in this charity consider seeking the support of a mediator. There’s quite a few of them available if that’s something they wanted to go down that path. But it’s quite clearly a dispute among the people involved in the charity and it is up to the charity itself to work through to a resolution. As we mentioned a few minutes ago, the ACNC doesn’t get involved in these internal disagreements and leave charity governance up to the charity. Another thing that occurs to me, just looking over that example there, is that I think sometimes there’s a misconception of what our role as a regulator is. So it mentions in this example that there was a request that the ACNC make the board reverse its decision. The boards of charities don’t answer to the ACNC. We… our role is to ensure that they’re following the regulations and following the ACNC Act, but we’re not involved in the decision-making processes, whether there’s a right or wrong.

Matt:

Yeah, right. A board is a board and it’s the board’s responsibility to govern the charity. We will come to some practical tips on how to manage an internal dispute like this in a little bit. But let’s have a look at another case study, this one a slightly different character. Again, a case study pieced together from common things we see and hear, but in and of itself not a real one. It’s the fiction based on reality. So Heath, what happened in this case study and how is it different to the first one?

Heath:

Similar to the previous one, the ACNC was contacted by members of a charity who thought that a board’s decision to award a contract for some work to a particular company wasn’t appropriate. At first it seemed like a classic internal dispute where there was disagreement with the decision rather than any breach of ACNC obligations. However, upon receiving a bit more information about the way the decision was made it became apparent that there may have been an undeclared conflict of interest and even the potential for the decision to not be in the best interests of the charity.

Matt:

Right, and this one is potentially something that would breach the obligations that a responsible person has under the ACNCs governance standards, those set of five minimum standards that we mentioned a few minutes ago?

Heath:

Well, one of those does require the responsible persons to act in the best interests of the charity. So in this case it became clear that there was one director pushing for the contract to go to a particular company, a company that she had a financial interest in. So yes, it’s fair to say that’s something that would interest, potentially interest the ACNC.

Matt:

Yeah, right. So in this case that fact that it was a company that she had a financial interest in obviously indicates that rather than acting in the best interests of the charity, she as a director, as a responsible person, was likely to be acting in her own interest using her influence as a charity director to I suppose secure a little financial windfall for herself.

Heath:

Yeah, so in this case it turned out that the ACNC could look into it. Not because there was an internal dispute, but because the internal dispute did indicate a broader problem. The internal dispute that resulted from the decision to award the contract to a particular company led to some of the other facts being brought to light. And it was these aspects that led to the ACNC becoming involved.

Matt:

Right, OK. So even though the internal dispute was I suppose the catalyst, the spark that led to some people contacting the ACNC, upon digging a little bit further, it was other aspects, other aspects of poor governance that allowed the ACNC to take a look at the case rather than the internal dispute itself?

Heath:

That’s right.

Matt:

Yeah, right. A subtle but important difference I suppose when thinking about how the ACNC manages these sorts of conflicts within charities. Let’s go over some of the practical things that you can do to help manage internal disputes. We’ve got quite a few here. We’ll go through them one by one and I might just preface, some of them may seem a little bit trite and a little bit obvious but we’ve included them here because some of those ones are often overlooked and not I suppose given the credit that they deserve as a small act or small things that a charity can do that have a really good effect on a charities operations with internal disputes. So let’s get into the first one. Heath, what’s one thing that charities should do?

Heath:

Charities should develop a culture of open and respectful communication and transparency. Especially when it comes to significant decisions and changes. They should make sure that all board decisions are clear and transparent and written records are very helpful here. And they should develop a strong team approach at board level.

Matt:

Yeah, and the written records is a really important one there and it sort of touches on the next one, which is to check the constitution and the rules or even any legislation, as the slide says, that may apply to your charity. Make sure that the charity has a clear dispute resolution process in the governing document, the constitution, the rules, or whatever formal document you have that set up the organisation, and follow it. And it’s important to make sure that the governing document is pretty clear on how, on some aspects of running an organisation. So how the responsible persons are elected, how they are terminated from their positions, the maximum term that they may be allowed to stay on the board. These sorts of rules set out clearly in writing in a document such as the constitution will go a long way to helping you solve internal disputes down the line, particularly when the people involved in the charity are aware of these rules, you can then point to them later and make sure they act as your guide to addressing an internal dispute. How about the third one here?

Heath:

It’s important to make time for those in dispute to meet face-to-face to discuss their dispute openly. Meeting face-to-face can often make a real difference. Some points can be resolved effectively and quickly in a face-to-face meeting. Maintain a respectful and non-judgemental attitude. Again, a face-to-face meeting is easier for this. Listen. Listen to what others have got to say.

Matt:

Yeah, that one sounds a bit trite, but believe us. We hear so many stories where by taking on some of these principles would have really prevented the internal dispute from getting as bad as it did. The next one, take notes, minutes, and keep records, can’t underestimate the importance of this. And if you’ve ever had to deal with an internal dispute and you didn’t have records of what was said and what was done months ago or years ago, you’ll know what I mean. This is incredibly crucial and really easy, too. It’s such an easy thing for a charity to do that can really help them get through an internal dispute later. So just take notes, keep meeting minutes, keep records of things that were said, emails, that sort of thing. And just on that, when you are bringing in new people, new directors or even new staff, check that you’re bringing in someone who is committed to the charitable purpose of the charity. And I’ve gone onto the next point here but make sure they’re committed and also make sure that the induction process that you give to them highlights the importance of these principles that we’re outlining here. So develop a culture of open, respectful communication and that sort of thing. OK, how about the next one, Heath?

Heath:

I think you touched on something important there that having that sense of charitable purpose will help keep some of these things perhaps more in perspective. If an agreement… but the next point is that if an agreement or compromise cannot be reached, consider using an independent mediator or a dispute resolution organisation. Some of these are free. I think I did mention this a little bit earlier. A quick search on Google will show that there’s a number of different mediation groups involved with different state governments around Australia. You can consider seeking legal advice, so if that’s necessary.

Matt:

We hope it doesn’t go that far but it is an option.

Heath:

Yeah, it’s not something that we want to see I suppose happening regularly. But the option is there, obviously. If the charity was in the wrong, they should acknowledge the mistake, apologise, provide information about how the matter has been addressed, and explain what’s been put in place to stop the same thing happening again.

Matt:

And as the last point says and as Heath just touched on, keep the charity’s purpose and values at the forefront of your mind. That will really help. Things you shouldn’t do is a shorter list and is still nonetheless important. Heath, what are some of the things a charity should not do?

Heath:

Don’t ignore or avoid an issue. That’s just not going to lead to a resolution. Don’t interrupt others while they’re speaker or dismiss different perspectives. Don’t forget to review your progress of agreed actions and don’t forget your governing documents and policies.

Matt:

Yeah, and if you don’t have the governing documents and policies that cover much of the operations of the charity, say an internal disputes resolution policy or something along those lines, it’s worth taking the time to draw one up because it can help you later on. And as we’ve got on the last point here, don’t forget to put the resolution in writing and send it to all parties. It’s keeping records of these sort of things is really important.

There’s a few things that you can and can’t do. And we have touched on the ACNCs role in internal disputes. So the good summary of the issue as a whole and how charities can approach internal disputes is here on the slide. So the first one, just remember that internal disputes don’t need to be a big problem, provided you get at them early enough. They can become a huge problem if, as Heath mentioned in the previous slide, if it’s left alone, if it’s ignored, if it’s not dealt with early. So they don’t have to be a big problem, just make sure you’ve set up the processes, policies to be able to deal with them.

Heath:

That’s right. Having differences of opinion is probably quite a healthy thing but it’s a matter of how they’re dealt with. The ACNC doesn’t deal with internal disputes and won’t act as mediator. That’s an important point that we’re trying to make today. We may, though, look into breaches of obligations to the ACNC that arise from internal disputes or cause internal disputes.

Matt:

I feel like I’ve been saying this a lot today, but it’s really an important point and again I will repeat it that it’s so easy and so effective that all charities really should be doing this, but keep records of discussions and meetings. It’s such an effective and simple way to help you out.

Heath:

And consider mediation if you can’t resolve the dispute. This may be an independent mediator using a dispute resolution service or even legal advice.

Matt:

Yes. And as we said, we hope you don’t have to get as far as legal advice, but that is an option there. But we think that if you can develop the culture and have the written rules and policies to support a health culture of open and honest communication, internal disputes will be dealt with early on, dealt with confidently and effectively and won’t have to be a big problem for a charity. Just the last thing we’ll say before we get onto some questions here is that, Heath touched on that a moment ago, disagreements aren’t necessarily a bad thing.

Heath:

Not at all.

Matt:

And a disagreement isn’t necessarily an internal dispute. Disagreements, in a way, should be welcomed if you’ve got a board of committed, passionate people seeking the best outcomes for the beneficiaries that their charities set up to help, you would hope that there is some informed, passionate discussion which inevitably contains a disagreement before a charity board makes a decision. That in and of itself isn’t a bad thing and doesn’t necessarily have to become this bigger fight, this internal dispute.

Heath:

Absolutely.

Matt:

We have had a few questions. I’ve got the slides in the wrong order there. Anyway, there’s a bunch of resources that we will include in our follow up email for you later today or tomorrow once we get, once we get this published on the website, the recording of the Webinar. And so there’s no need to write all those URLs down, it’s just an indication of the things that we’ve got on the website. And we do have some questions that have come through during the Webinar. A few that probably have some appeal to people in a range of charities, whether they’re tiny or large.

But one question is, has come through about dealing with creative personalities. So how do we deal with conflicts between creative personalities. I suppose I’ll take license to expand upon creative personalities and throw in an adjective like strong I suppose. If you’ve got some really strong or, you know, forceful personalities on a board or within a charity. How do you deal with conflicts between those types of people? It can be tough.

Heath:

It really helps if everyone’s clear on the rules and the charity has a clear policy for dispute resolution. If the rules of the charity clearly state how decisions are made and how the process for reviews or appeals works, then you can rely on this as the guide to addressing a dispute. The policy is something that may spell out the process for dispute resolution in a bit more detail. Having these rules written down is really important and will help to create a culture that confidently deals with disputes. Having these documents available to everyone is crucial, too. And don’t underestimate the value of face-to-face meetings. People are often more charitable, not always, in their treatment of others in person than they are over email or text message.

Matt:

Yeah, I suppose we’ve all had that moment where we receive an email and it sort of gets the blood boiling and you want to type a furious response immediately and hit send but you wouldn’t have had the same response had the difference of opinion come across in a face-to-face meeting.

Heath:

I’m sure we’ve all sent an email or text message that’s been misconstrued as well.

Matt:

That’s true, yeah, yeah. It’s much easier to read the cues on people’s faces and be able to avoid these pitfalls if you do put a focus on face-to-face meetings. Maybe that’s something that would be in the policy of an organisation or a process that they insist upon, you know, a set number of face-to-face meetings to cover a dispute rather than going back and forth over email. I know that’s not practical for all organisations, particularly when you’ve got directors spread out over the country. But it could be something that could help organisations if it’s available to them.

Another question has come through. OK, it’s on this point of culture. So we talk about having a good culture, a culture of an organisation that deals confidently with internal disputes, a culture that’s open and has respectful communication at its core. That is a bit of an abstract piece of advice. So the question is, what is a good way to begin a good culture of dealing with internal disputes? I suppose if a person thinks that the organisation currently doesn’t have a good culture, how do they go about creating one?

Heath:

Well, I think if they’re concerned that it’s not part of the culture, starting by talking about it’s a good idea. But some of the points we’ve got here that are things that organisations can do. They can make a prominent feature of any induction process. So when there’s a new director, new staff member, new volunteer, the message should be the same. Reiterate the rules of the organisation, how the organisation makes decisions, and all the processes involved. Don’t just gloss over this in the beginning, it can come back to bite later. Make sure people know the organisation’s values from the outset. It takes time to develop culture, of course. This will not happen overnight. But as personnel changes and as time goes by, you’ll see positive changes.

Matt:

Yeah, and it really does begin at the beginning, to say something else that might sound trite at its surface. But if you start with an induction process and make sure the new director, the new staff member, the new office manager, the new set of volunteers is told about the organisation’s culture, knows about the policies for dealing with internal disputes, then it can really help just set the broader culture of the organisation. And it will help you deal with internal disputes later.

We’ve got time for one more question. We’re sort of pushing upon almost 40 minutes now. This question is about resources. So someone’s just asked, are there any good resources for this sort of thing? I can understand the source of the question because it can be daunting to set about writing a policy or a procedure or that sort of thing and it’s not something that we often turn our minds to in our day-to-day lives and it can be something that, well, for a lot of people, they simply don’t have time to do. So aside from the ACNCs resources, which we had listed in the slide before and you will get in your follow up email, there are some good template policies and other documents and advice, documents and guidance online. Ourcommunity.com.au is an organisation that has a good one, a good template for dispute resolution policies. And that can be found just with a Google search or by heading the Our Community website.

Also, actually Heath mentioned this during the Webinar that most states have dispute resolution organisations that may be able to offer resources and advice. These organisations vary in how they provide their advice or resources will vary. But it is worth looking in, just a search of Google of dispute resolution centre will bring up a wide range of organisations and services from all over the country. And as we said before, some of these are free and it’s definitely worth checking out.

Heath:

Yeah.

Matt:

OK. Well that sort of brings us to the end of today’s Webinar. We do, just a couple of things to cover here. You can stay in touch with the ACNC by signing up to email updates and the Commissioner’s Column. We’ve also got lots of guidance on the website, including podcasts, video content, and Webinars like this, recordings of those on the website that you can view at any time. Give us a call actually. This is something that we didn’t really talk about too much during the presentation. But if you’re unsure, if you think you may have an internal dispute or you think that the internal dispute might be an indicator of something worse or something that we could look into, it is worth giving us a call. We have a really knowledgeable team here at the phone number of 132262 who will be able to talk to you about your particular circumstance and give you advice on if the ACNC can get involved firstly, and then also if there are other ways in which you can resolve your own dispute.

Heath:

Yeah. I think like we’ve kept on saying, normally the answer that they’re going to give you in the case of a dispute is that the ACNC can’t get involved in the dispute. But hopefully our staff will be able to guide you to some resources. They potentially would be able to, if it was something we could get involved in. And just generally have a conversation with you, we’re very keen to offer that support the not-for-profit and charity sector.

Matt:

Yeah, often talking about it can help make it clearer in your own mind, too. Can also send us an email at advice@acnc.gov.au and we’re pretty active on social media. Thank you for your attendance at today’s Webinar. Just last thing, as we close the Webinar you will, or as you leave the Webinar you will receive an option to do a survey at the end which is very short. I think it’s only three questions, off the top of my head from memory. And it, we get a lot out of these surveys. So if you’ve got the time, the 20 seconds or so it takes to do it, send us a note. It’s really greatly appreciated, we look forward to seeing all the comments in there and then shaping Webinars according to what people see as valuable. So that would be really appreciated.

You can have a look at all the recordings of our Webinars at acnc.gov.au/Webinars. And if you have any other questions, comments, or feedback after you’ve done the survey, you cans end it to education@acnc.gov.au. Once again, thanks for your time today. We hope you found today’s topic useful. We will send you a follow up email with lots of links to resources and a link to the recording that you can share with people you know. Thanks Heath.

Heath:

No worries. Thank you, Matt.

Matt:

Thanks to Chris who’s been answering all your questions in the background. And we look forward to your attendance at the next Webinar next month. Thanks everybody.

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